Should You Cut Your Dog’s Nails at Home?

16th June, 2015
Most dogs naturally wear their nails down by walking, running, and playing. If you regularly walk your dog on hard surfaces like cement or asphalt, those walks will do a lot for keeping his nails in check. However, inactive dogs often don’t wear their nails out as quickly, nor do inside dogs or elderly dogs with less incentive to run around the house. Maintaining your dog’s nails is an important part of keeping him healthy and is a concept with which you should become familiar no matter what type of dog or activity schedule you have. How Long Should My Dog’s Nails Be? If you can hear your dog’s nails clicking on the ground when he walks, his nails are probably too long. This depends on the way in which your dog walks — dogs with bouncy gaits sometimes click the floor regardless of their nail length. But generally, nails on the floor are a good indicator that a trim is in order. If your dog’s nails touch the ground while he’s standing still it’s definitely time to trim them back. Teaching Your Dog to Handle Trimming Trimming dog nails is different from trimming human nails. First, many dogs do not like having their feet handled. Second, dog nails contain a sensitive quick that will bleed and cause pain if nicked. Thus, you have to learn to carefully trim your dog’s nails while still making the experience positive. One of the easiest ways to do this is to clip one nail and then give your dog a small treat. Clip another nail and provide another treat. If your dog learns that getting his nails clipped results in tasty treats, he’ll be much more willing to participate. It’s also important to work with dogs and puppies on proper handling. You should be touching your dog’s feet, ears, mouth, legs, tail, and every other part of his body so he’s not afraid to be handled. This is for more than nail clipping; it also makes vet visits and other important examinations much easier. How to Cut Dog Nails Begin by purchasing a nail clipper made for dog nails. Human nail clippers are not the right shape or size for the task. Guillotine clippers are by far the easiest solution, but plier clippers work as well. It’s all about what feels best for you and your dog’s nail size. Next, get your dog calm. Give him some time to run around and play so that he’s feeling de-stressed, and provide him with some relaxing physical attention to put him in the right mindset. Choose a nail to trim. Take your dog’s foot with your hand and hold it firmly in place. Line up the clippers with the nail and squeeze them quickly to clip off the excess material. Be careful not to clip the quick! With clear nails the quick is clearly visible under the exterior nail material, but with dark nails you’ll need to trim just a little bit at a time, […]
Should You Cut Your Dog’s Nails at Home?

Cutting your dog’s nails after a bath will make the job easier.

Most dogs naturally wear their nails down by walking, running, and playing. If you regularly walk your dog on hard surfaces like cement or asphalt, those walks will do a lot for keeping his nails in check. However, inactive dogs often don’t wear their nails out as quickly, nor do inside dogs or elderly dogs with less incentive to run around the house.

Maintaining your dog’s nails is an important part of keeping him healthy and is a concept with which you should become familiar no matter what type of dog or activity schedule you have.

How Long Should My Dog’s Nails Be?

If you can hear your dog’s nails clicking on the ground when he walks, his nails are probably too long. This depends on the way in which your dog walks — dogs with bouncy gaits sometimes click the floor regardless of their nail length. But generally, nails on the floor are a good indicator that a trim is in order. If your dog’s nails touch the ground while he’s standing still it’s definitely time to trim them back.

Teaching Your Dog to Handle Trimming

Trimming dog nails is different from trimming human nails. First, many dogs do not like having their feet handled. Second, dog nails contain a sensitive quick that will bleed and cause pain if nicked. Thus, you have to learn to carefully trim your dog’s nails while still making the experience positive. One of the easiest ways to do this is to clip one nail and then give your dog a small treat. Clip another nail and provide another treat. If your dog learns that getting his nails clipped results in tasty treats, he’ll be much more willing to participate.

It’s also important to work with dogs and puppies on proper handling. You should be touching your dog’s feet, ears, mouth, legs, tail, and every other part of his body so he’s not afraid to be handled. This is for more than nail clipping; it also makes vet visits and other important examinations much easier.

How to Cut Dog Nails

Begin by purchasing a nail clipper made for dog nails. Human nail clippers are not the right shape or size for the task. Guillotine clippers are by far the easiest solution, but plier clippers work as well. It’s all about what feels best for you and your dog’s nail size. Next, get your dog calm. Give him some time to run around and play so that he’s feeling de-stressed, and provide him with some relaxing physical attention to put him in the right mindset. Choose a nail to trim. Take your dog’s foot with your hand and hold it firmly in place. Line up the clippers with the nail and squeeze them quickly to clip off the excess material. Be careful not to clip the quick! With clear nails the quick is clearly visible under the exterior nail material, but with dark nails you’ll need to trim just a little bit at a time, then stop trimming when you see a small grey or pink oval appearing in the nail.

The best way to make your dog comfortable with nail trimming is to take it slow and steady, one step at a time, and to perform the process often. The more frequently you clip your dog’s nails, the more he’ll consider it part of his normal life. Plus, well-maintained nails help prevent infections, ingrown nails, and other health complications. Keep your dog healthy from his head to his toes!

Should You Cut Your Dog’s Nails at Home? обновлено: January 25, 2017 автором: admin_1
Stay In touch with Vet-Organics
Join A Community of Pet Lovers
Exclusive Deals and Benefits
Monthly Pet Health News and Tips

Related Articles

PSA: 2017 Canine Influenza Outbreak

At Vet Organics, we understand that pets are family and family matters most. That’s why we are providing this important public service announcement about the 2017 Canine Influenza outbreak that has ...
22nd November, 2017

Preparing Our Guests and Pets For Holiday Parties

The holidays are here and no matter what holidays we celebrate, if we are hosting a party, we know there’s a lot of prep work to get underway. Menu planning, house cleaning, decorations, invitations...
21st November, 2017

8 Thanksgiving Feast Staples You Can Share With Your Pets!

We’re sitting at the table, enjoying time with family and friends, and then we feel something at our side. We look down and there they are. Those sweet, curious, hopeful little puppy dog eyes are st...
15th November, 2017

Best Tips on Safety, Health, And Play For Dogs In Autumn

Autumn has a lot to offer for everyone. It’s cooler and can be more comfortable, but we need to keep our attention on how the season can affect our four-legged friends. These tips for dogs in Autumn...
14th November, 2017

More Top Tips: Safety, Health, And Play For Dogs In Autumn

Football, Fall foliage, family feasts, and fairer weather are just a few of the fabulous changes in Autumn. But every season has its opportunities and dangers, happy pastimes and health hazards. Autum...
9th November, 2017

How To Calculate Your Dog’s Or Cat’s Age in Human Years Part Two

Knowing our dog’s or cat’s age in human years is more than satisfying a curiosity. It helps us understand where our dog or cat is developmentally. Their human-equivalent age helps us anticipat...
7th November, 2017

How To Calculate Your Dog’s Or Cat’s Age in Human Years – Part One

There’s a lot of folklore around how we should calculate our pet’s age in human years, but what is considered the best way to calculate their age? Is it calculated differently in different life st...
2nd November, 2017

What You Need to Know About Pumpkins and Dog Nutrition: It Isn’t Just For Pie & Lattes

Lately, every Fall delectable is pumpkin flavored, colored, or themed. We love them in traditional fixings like pie and there are other fan favorites like pancakes, lattes, fancy hummus, and roasted g...
31st October, 2017

16 Ways to Celebrate National Cat Day – October 29th

  Who doesn’t love a reason to celebrate? National Cat Day is a great reason to do something fun with our cats, for our cats, or for cats everywhere. From adoption to snuggles to crafting to pa...
26th October, 2017

How Cats & Dogs Drink Water: A Fascinating Look at Fluid Dynamics

We don’t have to be scientists to appreciate or be fascinated by science. How dogs drink water is one example of raw, fascinating science at work. And once we understand what it’s like for our fou...
24th October, 2017

Do Dogs Dream?

Those twitchy little paws. Their soft growls or sad, emotive howls while they sleep. Do dogs dream? It sure seems like it. And what do they dream about? It may seem difficult to know for sure, but the...
21st October, 2017

Is Your Dog A Litter-Box Hound? Tips & Tricks To End The Raids

The litter-box hound can raid in secret or in plain site. For those with dogs who stay clear of the litter box, congrats. But for those of us who have to cope with canine companions who mistake the ki...
17th October, 2017

Adopt A Dog Month For Those Who Aren’t Adopting

October is Adopt a Dog Month, but not everyone is ready to take the plunge. For those who are still researching breeds, lifestyle needs, and how a fur-baby will fir in their home, there’s a ton we c...
11th October, 2017

What Can I Do About My Dog Who Won’t Eat? Part 2

Dog guardianship can come with a lot of confusing learning curves. We often think of dogs as perpetually hungry and able to eat just about anything put in front of them. But some of us have a dog who ...
10th October, 2017

Why Isn’t My Dog Hungry? Part One

For those of us who have labradors, a dog who doesn’t eat can sound impossible. In fact, for many dog guardians, a dog who refuses to eat can seem like a joke. Most dogs will eat whatever is put...
7th October, 2017
Testimonials
Testimonials
EcoEars by Vet Organics fixed our girl's ears in the first couple of days & she was a whole new, happy dog again. THANK YOU Vet Organics!!!*
Nikki Wiedmer
Thank you for the peace of mind that my dog is not in discomfort anymore, thank you for this product being organic and good for our dog's ears, and seriously thank you for giving us an option to help our old pup with a product we can afford.
Melissa Block Demant
I used this product for my Boston last summer. Worked awesome. In 2 days, I've seen a improvement. Within 4 days, the infection was gone. My pit bull started having an issue with his right ear. It was bad. It was so infected. I used EcoEars twice a day and again it worked like magic!! 4 days have passed and you can't even tell he had an ear issue!! I will never use anything else. This stuff is fantastic!! Thank you Vet Organics for such an amazing product!!*
Tina Neupauer
EcoEars is a great product! I used it in my Lacey's ears and we haven't had any problems since.
Bonnie Schweitzer
This stuff really works--after spending money at the vet @ $25 a bottle, it's saving me a lot of money.
José Olivo
*Results may vary based on factors such as age, size and physical condition of your pet.
Vet Organics supplements are manufactured from natural and organic materials known to improve a pet's health regimen and quality of life. If you suspect that your pet may be suffering from a severe medical condition, consult your veterinarian immediately.
Share
Tweet
+1